The Bible tells us that when Jesus ascended into heaven, the disciples were to wait until they were told what to do. They had chosen Matthias to replace Judas, and there were approximately  120 people gathered together. This is when, on the day of Pentecost, and they were all together again, that the Holy Spirit was poured out on all of them, not just the twelve. They were filled with the Spirit and began to speak in other languages. But the sound created from this drew a crowd of people in Jerusalem at the time. People from all different parts of the known world, and they spoke many different languages.  All those who had been filled with the Spirit of the Lord, began to communicate with the crowd. People heard the message in their own language. But obviously not all heard the message. Listen to how Scripture records it: “Parthians, Medes, Elamites; those who live in Mesopotamia, in Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia. Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs – we hear them speaking the magnificent acts of God in our own languages. They were all astounded and perplexed, saying to one another, ‘What could this be?’ But some sneered and said, ‘They’re full of new wine!'” Acts 2:9-13  So little has changed from that day. Today, men and women, who are called to be that voice, still speak in the language that people can understand, but some will not listen, and use other excuses when they hear the message of God. Paul would tell the church at Corinth: “For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but it is God’s power to us who are being saved.”  1 Corinthians 1:18  We can’t expect that everyone we speak to will listen, and it is not up to us to judge who is worthy of hearing and who is not.

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